Sunday, August 29, 2010

Can Twitter Develop a Substantial Revenue Stream?

Twitter has been on every marketers mind. It's an easy and useful tool when it comes to dialogue and customer service. But when it comes to making money, there are still many debates on how Twitter fits in the grand scheme of things. 

Paul Verna, Senior Analyst, has done an interesting article on looking into Twitter as a potential revenue stream. Please let me know your thoughts on his article.


Friday, August 27, 2010

NYTimes: Bernanke Signals Fed Is Ready to Prop Up Economy

What?

"Prop Up"?

Surely our economic system, which is the largest in the world, is not that flimsy - right?


The New York Times:

Bernanke Signals Fed Is Ready to Prop Up Economy

Ben S. Bernanke gave his strongest indication yet on Friday that he was determined to prevent the economy from slipping into a cycle of falling prices.

http://nyti.ms/915Ghl


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Two Web Site Developers Said to Team Up With Starcom for Digital Ad Dollars

From The New York Times:

Two Web Site Developers Said to Team Up With Starcom for Digital Ad Dollars

The two companies plan to spend substantial amounts of money on advertising for new types of digital entertainment.

http://nyti.ms/drE5Sg


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Sunday, August 15, 2010

China: The Second-Largest Economy

The article below introduces a very scary reality for the world economy. As most nations struggle to avoid the grips of the "silent decade monster" that Japan has experienced, China is taking advantage of their momentum by doing all that it takes to continue their unusual growth. It changes the game for many reasons. One, there are significant political implications for all the major superpowers. Second, there will be an even more competitive fight for scarce natural resources. And finally, the concept of currency may be in a global tailspin in the near future.

Nonetheless, the U.S. is still, by far, the economic superpower. But, this country now faces a more aggressive competitor in China. The name of the game is exports, and at this time, America is pretty much stuck with no good ideas. Additionally, we struggle from the trust issue with financial products, due to the dispersion of toxic assets. The keys rest in innovation through energy and technology; a game-changing discovery that transform daily life for most of the globe. Stay tuned for more information on American exports.

From The New York Times:

China Passes Japan as Second-Largest Economy

Experts say that unseating Japan — and in recent years passing Germany, France and Great Britain — underscores China's growing clout.

http://nyti.ms/bKevRr


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Remembering Jazz Singer And Activist Abbey Lincoln

I found the following story on the NPR iPad App:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129203432&sc=ipad&f=124289519

Remembering Jazz Singer And Activist Abbey Lincoln
by Allison Keyes

NPR - August 15, 2010

Abbey Lincoln, the legendary jazz singer who believed in singing as a political act, died Saturday in Manhattan. She was 80. An actress, artist and composer, Lincoln created music ranging from avant-garde civil-rights-era recordings to the equally powerful but more introspective work of her later years.

Her 1960 collaboration with jazz drummer Max Roach, We Insist! Max Roach's Freedom Now Suite, put her voice smack in the middle of the soundtrack of the civil-rights movement. In "Triptych: Prayer/Protest/Peace," Lincoln literally screams her anger. But that's not how she started out.

Village Voice jazz critic Nat Hentoff supervised the recording of the Freedom Now Suite and watched Lincoln transform from a sultry nightclub singer into a more sophisticated artist. Hentoff says Lincoln was a sometimes self-deprecating woman with a ready, sardonic wit, and says her death is a huge loss to a jazz community that doesn't have musicians like her anymore.

"You hear who they are as they play. They're telling stories," he says. "As Lester Young used to say, everybody tells a story. So we've lost one of the few still here who was always telling a story."

Lincoln was born Anna Marie Wooldridge in Chicago on Aug. 6, 1930. The 10th of 12 children, she claimed the living-room piano as her own private space. After singing in the church choir and amateur contests, she moved to Los Angeles at 19 for a different kind of venue: nightclubs. At the urging of her manager, Lincoln worked her sex appeal as a club singer. But later, after meeting drummer Max Roach and becoming immersed in the struggles of black people around the world, she earned a reputation for being a warrior. She sometimes took on less serious roles, too.

"It always did the actresses in, because I was the one who was supposed to have this reputation as a freedom fighter ... and I got two movies," Lincoln told NPR's Roy Hurst in a 2003 interview.

One of those movies was 1968's For Love of Ivy, alongside actor Sidney Poitier, in which she plays an unconventional maid with a mind of her own. Lincoln told NPR that the film's producers thought she would play a more subdued role -- she didn't.

Lincoln continued her maverick music career, writing songs and compositions with sharp imagery. Chicago jazz singer Maggie Brown collaborated with Lincoln on her 1999 album, Wholly Earth. Brown says Lincoln advised her to focus on the music and not to get bogged down in worries about agents and money.

"She [told me], 'Don't worry about that. Just sing,' " Brown says. "You know, just bring the art."

Brown, who performs a tribute to Lincoln called Maggie Sings Abbey, had known Lincoln since she was a child. She says Lincoln brought intensity to both her performances and her personal life, and says she was very secure in who she was.

"She was committed to her art," Brown says. "She seemed very clear of what her purpose was, what she was to do."

Lincoln once said that when people leave this Earth, they spread their wings of miracles in a blaze of light and disappear. Luckily, Lincoln's spirit lives on in her recordings. [Copyright 2010 National Public Radio]

To learn more about the NPR iPad app, go to http://ipad.npr.org/recommendnprforipad



Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Saturday, August 14, 2010

NYTimes: Free Parking Comes at a Price

This is an interesting view. Do you agree?

From The New York Times:

ECONOMIC VIEW: Free Parking Comes at a Price

Many people see a free parking space as an entitlement, but an author argues that it's a subsidy that wastes space and money.

http://nyti.ms/afMGyT


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

NYTimes: Police in South Korea Raid Google’s Office

Police in South Korea Raid Google's Office

The inquiry arose from concern that the company had illegally collected and stored personal wireless data as it shot video for its Street View service.

http://nyti.ms/9QzsBO


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

NYTimes: Web Plan Is Dividing Companies

This is important news from both a business and public policy perspective. I'm not sure which side I support. The open access concept has helped to launch the web 2.0 movement, but it has also hampered revenue generation.

I would like to know your thoughts.


The New York Times:

Web Plan Is Dividing Companies

Facebook said it would not support a proposal by Google and Verizon to regulate Internet access, while an AT&T executive called the plan a "reasonable framework."

http://nyti.ms/dhvJII


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Cellphone ‘Death Grip’ Increases Radiation Exposure, One App Shows | Wired.com

I wanted to share this article from Wired.com with you:

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/08/death-grip-radiation/

Cellphone 'Death Grip' Increases Radiation Exposure, One App Shows
Not only does a "death grip" cut into your phone's ability to connect, it also increases the amount of radio-frequency radiation it's pumping out. Now you can see exactly how much more radiation your head is absorbing, with an app that estimates the RF output of your smartphone in real time.


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Monday, August 09, 2010

NYTimes: Fed Shifting Its Debate to Deflation

What does this mean for the products and designs of the future? Where is the price equilibrium for common assets?

From The New York Times:

Fed Shifting Its Debate to Deflation

Policy makers are increasingly focused on the potential for the economy to slip into a deflationary spiral of declining demand, prices and wages.

http://nyti.ms/9mZALv


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Food for Thought

Sunday, August 08, 2010

Media Isn't Social

http://darmano.typepad.com/logic_emotion/2010/08/media.html

Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

NYTimes: But Will It Make You Happy?

This is good information for marketing and product development professionals. It relates to the new normal, and much more.

From The New York Times:

But Will It Make You Happy?

How you spend has a greater effect on your happiness than how much you spend, researchers say.

http://nyti.ms/afw0ZE


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Saturday, August 07, 2010

NYTimes: Across Nation, Mosque Projects Meet Opposition

From The New York Times:

Across Nation, Mosque Projects Meet Opposition

Heated confrontations have broken out in communities where mosques are proposed near far less hallowed locations than ground zero in New York City.

http://nyti.ms/b4GGxY


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Retailers Worry Over Depressed Wages, Job Losses

I found the following story on the NPR iPad App:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129054290&sc=ipad&f=1006

Retailers Worry Over Depressed Wages, Job Losses
by Marilyn Geewax

NPR - August 8, 2010

July's dismal unemployment report, released Friday by the Labor Department, confirmed what millions of Americans already knew: It's still tough to find a job.

But at least for people who do have jobs, the report held a bit of encouraging news: Wages ticked up slightly last month after stagnating in June. Workers' pay was 1.8 percent higher than the same month last year.

By historic standards, that level of wage growth is weak. But government statistics show employers aren't withholding raises. Rather, they are directing the compensation increases to the rising costs of health care benefits.

As a result, employers are feeling squeezed by higher benefits costs, and workers are feeling squeezed by very slow wage growth.

That pinch worries retailers who are launching back-to-school promotions. They are hoping shoppers can afford to buy lots of shoes and backpacks and jeans in coming weeks. For retailers, the back-to-school shopping season is the second most important of the year, after Christmas.

Early indications point to only modest sales gains this year. The National Retail Federation predicts families with school age children will spend about 10 percent more for school supplies and clothes compared with last year. Given how depressed sales were last summer, however, that level of growth would still mark a subdued recovery.

Sales reports also show most shoppers are still watching their pennies. The No. 1 destination for shoppers continues to be the big discount stores, and most people are paying cash or using debit cards to avoid running up more debt.

Another problem for retailers is the exceptionally high unemployment rate among teenagers, who traditionally do a lot of the back-to-school shopping. The July jobs report showed that more than 1 in 4 teen job-seekers cannot find work.

The lack of spending money among young people is being felt at teen clothing stores, many of which released disappointing July sales reports last week. Now chains, like Abercrombie & Fitch and American Eagle Outfitters, are slashing prices on jeans. Others have been staging buy-on-get-one free promotions.

But retail analysts say deep discounting alone won't change the profit picture for many stores. The key to the recovery is a stronger job market with better wage growth. [Copyright 2010 National Public Radio]

To learn more about the NPR iPad app, go to http://ipad.npr.org/recommendnprforipad



Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Global Warming Real?

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/08/ice-breaks-off/