Tuesday, March 29, 2011

BBC E-mail: Young people redefine the American Dream

I saw this story on the BBC News iPad App and thought you should see it.

** Young people redefine the American Dream **
US pollster John Zogby says fewer Americans think it the American Dream is attainable but many have redefined what that dream means.
< http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-12839437 >


** BBC Daily E-mail **
Choose the news and sport headlines you want - when you want them, all in one daily e-mail
< http://www.bbc.co.uk/email >


** Disclaimer **
The BBC is not responsible for the content of this e-mail, and anything written in this e-mail does not necessarily reflect the BBC's views or opinions. Please note that neither the e-mail address nor name of the sender have been verified.


Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Sunday, March 20, 2011

NYTimes: Arizona, Bowing to Business, Softens Stand on Immigration

Theory #423: The rationale of business is reducing discrimination more than policy or social movements. Sports provides somewhat of an example of what happens - objective measures for supply/demand and performance.

From The New York Times:

Arizona, Bowing to Business, Softens Stand on Immigration

The State Senate voted down several anti-immigration bills, an admission that last year's laws had hurt the state's tourism and convention industry.

http://nyti.ms/e3rGJs

Get The New York Times on your iPhone for free by visiting http://itunes.com/apps/nytimes


Thank You,

Kenyatta Lovett
770-601-7441

Sent from my iPhone

NYTimes: The Japanese Could Teach Us a Thing or Two

From The New York Times:

OP-ED COLUMNIST: The Japanese Could Teach Us a Thing or Two

The selfless teamwork in Japan following the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis can inspire us all.

http://nyti.ms/eRfF47

Get The New York Times on your iPhone for free by visiting http://itunes.com/apps/nytimes


Thank You,

Kenyatta Lovett
770-601-7441

Sent from my iPhone

Wednesday, March 09, 2011

Cool Hunting: Terada Mokei

Terada Mokei

Paper pop-ups shrink everyday life into adorably tiny scenarios


by Meghan Killeen

A slice of life shrinks even smaller with the miniature design line, Terada Mokei. Architect-turned-modeler Naoki Terada's Architectural Model Accessories Series is a monochrome microcosmic representation of everyday life. Terada adopted a 1/100 scale ratio for the series, promoting a metric-based "global standard" that adorably scales down the largeness of reality to one-hundredth the size.

Populating the paper environments, Terada's version of the modern man and his archetypal family consist of featureless cookie-cutter silhouettes of male, female and child figures. Each series places a variation of the family in different scenarios, ranging from park activities to earthquake-disrupted dinners and office obsequiousness, all packaged in single-colored sheets of pre-cut parts, reminiscent of model die-cuts.

Terada Mokei also features a line of Architectural Model Greeting Cards. Pop-up figures with word-bubble expressions say it when you can't with this sentimental stationary.

The 1/100 Architectural Model Accessories Series retails for ¥1,575, with the Architectural Greeting Cards selling for ¥580, both from the Terada Mokei website.

Read on Cool Hunting
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Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Cool Hunting: Alfa Romeo 4C

Alfa Romeo 4C

Alfa Romeo's supercar concept hints at re-entry into the U.S. market


Drawing steady crowds when it debuted at the Geneva International Motor Show last week, Alfa Romeo's new 4C concept was on the tip of nearly every editor's tongue as a show favorite. While the allure of the two-door's matte red finish and seductively crisp design flourishes turned heads, the marriage of supercar inspiration with a compact body will go into production in 2012 and suggests a bold future—perhaps even a hotly-anticipated return to the U.S. market—for the brand.

Based on the success of their flagship, limited-edition 8C Competizione, introduced in 2007, as well as the 8C Spider, the rear wheel-drive 4C shares a look "shaped by the wind." Designed by the Alfa Romeo Style Center, the body doesn't just borrow lines from vintage Alfa Romeo's, like the famed 6C 1500 and 6C 2500, but uses the same weight and power distribution ratio that made those cars so fast.

What the 4C lacks in power (four-cylinders compared to the brawny eight of its forerunners), it makes up with clever suspension layout and a lighter-weight frame, comprised mostly of carbon and an aluminum rear, to ensure maximum agility—which isn't to say that the engine doesn't pack a punch. At 200+ horsepower with a top speed of 250 km/hr, a new "twin dry clutch" transmission, going from zero to 100km in under five seconds) and a system that eliminates turbo lag, you can already find this gasoline engine in current production models like the Giulietta, a compact Alfa that has fans salivating for it to come stateside.

If parent brand Fiat coming to the U.S. is any indication, the company will likely use its Chrysler platform for the 4C, which would make it the first model to hit these shores since Alfa Spiders ceased production in the mid-'90s. While there's no word on price yet, (though it will hit somewhere below the Competizione's $100,000 tag), here's hoping a suitable repair network comes with it.

Read on Cool Hunting
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Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Cool Hunting: Bos Iced Tea

Bos Iced Tea

A wholly indigenous iced tea that reflects South Africa's bold spirit


Bold "Afro pop" graphics set the tone for South Africa's newest cold beverage, an iced tea bursting with fruit flavor. Utilizing the region's indigenous Rooibos plant, Bos offers five caffeine- and preservative-free blends—Peach, Apple, Lemon, Energy and Slim—each mixed with spring water from Western Cape's Cederberg mountains.

Already an inherently healthy herb for its high level of antioxidants, the Rooibos in Bos tea is also ethically sourced from the Klipopmekaar farm and nature reserve. Klipopmekaar uses renewable energy and certified organic farming methods to cultivate the portion of land they dedicate to growing Rooibos—the rest of the 11,000-plus acres they keep as a bio-diverse wilderness reserve.

Reflecting the contents inside, Bos' graphic design for the slim tin cans combines African mythology with the continent's classic bright color palette. This attractive packaging recently placed Bos as a finalist for Design Indaba's "Most Beautiful Object" award.

Made entirely in South Africa, Bos has yet to take an international stage but sells from cafes around the country.

Read on Cool Hunting
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Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Saturday, March 05, 2011

What Are We Doing?

It's been sometime since I've written in this blog. I've been bummed out from work and school, and the flat economy has me losing my enthusiasm for most things. Anyway, it's time to write and get my thoughts out there, with the hope of influencing others to do something positive. My topic for today has to do with democracy without consensus.

I just finished watching Waiting for Superman, which is a documentary on the public school system in the United States. Instead of being inspired and pumped up, it made me very depressed for many reasons. One, the debate about public schools is a conversation between those who benefit directly from its failure or success, but don't want to be responsible for either outcome. It would be easier to watch the end of Titanic than to explain the mentality of those in the conversation. Two, we, the people, have allowed others to use improper definitions and terms to justify unethical decisions. And finally, we all want our freedom, our rights, and the notion of decentralization. However, we also feel that this right justifies the rationale behind never reaching a consensus - never making the tough decisions. I like to call this the "drowning debate, while drowning".

I don't have a point to make today. I am just frustrated with our bad solutions to make due until we can make up another bad solution. 

Thursday, March 03, 2011

Cool Hunting: Cool Hunting Video Presents: Marvin Watches

Cool Hunting Video Presents: Marvin Watches

In our latest video a revived Swiss watchmaker takes us behind the scenes to look at design and handcraft


We traveled to beautiful Neuchâtel, Switzerland to learn the history of Marvin Watches, a brand celebrating it's 160th birthday and its re-introduction to consumers. Once one of the largest watchmakers in Switzerland the company suffered at the end of the last century, and was resurrected by husband and wife team Cécile and Jean-Daniel Maye eight years ago. Their hard work has paid off, and Marvin Watches was just launched in the U.S. and most European markets in October 2010.

Cécile shares Marvin's story and walks us through the year-long process of making a watch. Celebrated watch designer Sébastian Perret has been instrumental in Marvin's renaissance, and he shares his process for creating a watch from sketch to prototype.

While we were at Marvin we worked with Cécile and Sébastien to design our "Toujours Plus" Malton 160 Cushion, a Cool Hunting Edition collaboration.

Read on Cool Hunting
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Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad

Meditation And Modern Art Meet In Rothko Chapel

I found the following story on the NPR iPad App:
http://www.npr.org/2011/03/01/134160717/meditation-and-modern-art-meet-in-rothko-chapel?sc=ipad&f=1008

Meditation And Modern Art Meet In Rothko Chapel
by Pat Dowell

NPR - March 1, 2011

The Rothko Chapel is an interfaith sanctuary, a center for human rights — and a one-man art museum devoted to 14 monumental paintings by abstract expressionist Mark Rothko. The Houston landmark, commissioned by John and Dominique de Menil, opened its doors 40 years ago, in February 1971.

For the past four decades, the chapel has encouraged cooperation between people of all faiths — or of no faith at all. While the chapel itself has become an art landmark and a center for human-rights action, the sanctuary's creator never lived to see it finished. Rothko committed suicide in 1970.

A Quiet Space

Approaching the chapel from the south, visitors first see a steel sculpture called Broken Obelisk by Barnett Newman in the middle of a pool — it appears to be floating on the surface of the water. The chapel itself is a windowless, octagonal brick building. Solid black doors open on a tiny glass-walled foyer. (The foyer was walled off from the rest of the interior when the Gulf Coast's notorious humidity began to affect the paintings.)

The main room is a hushed octagonal space with gray stucco walls, each filled by massive paintings. Some walls feature one canvas, while on others, three canvases hang side by side to form a triptych. A baffled skylight subdues the bright Houston sun, and the surfaces of the paintings change dramatically as unseen clouds pass outside. There are eight austere wooden benches informally arranged, and today, a few meditation mats. A young woman brings the meditation hour to a close by striking a small bowl with a mallet, creating a soft peal of three bells in the intense silence of the room.

Concerts, conferences, lectures, weddings and memorial services all take place in the chapel throughout the year, but on most days you will find visitors — about 55,000 annually come to see, to meditate, to write in the large comment book in the foyer, to read the variety of well-thumbed religious texts available on benches at the entrance.

'It's Their Place'

There is always an attendant to greet people, answer questions, and, if necessary, ask visitors to put their cell phones away. Suna Umari has worked at the chapel in various jobs for 30 years, most recently as historian. She also takes a turn as attendant, and her eight-hour shifts have given her a new sense of what the chapel means to visitors.

"People feel it's their place," she says. Her relaxed, almost musical voice fits well with the atmosphere of the place. "They come, and they have a problem, and they cry in this space. If you look at the comment books, they make comments to each other as though this was their personal little diary."

Umari says there's one couple who visits the chapel every six months:

­

"The first time I saw them, they must have had a fight, because she came in and sat down; then he followed," Umari says. "He sat next to her, and she ignored him. She kept turning her head away from him. They whispered to each other, and pretty soon they made up."

When the couple came out to the foyer, the man wrote a declaration of his love in the comment book — he used a whole page. The woman wrote that she loved him back.

For one visitor with a very personal connection to the chapel, the experience was unnerving.

"I wasn't prepared for that when I walked in the door," says Christopher Rothko, the painter's son. He was a child when the Rothko Chapel opened. He didn't come to see it until he was 33 years old, and he was surprised that at first, the paintings didn't really communicate with him. After all, he points out, he's used to conversing with Rothkos on a daily basis. But not that day.

"I almost left with nothing," Rothko says, but he lingered for a little while, "and ended up spending an hour and 15 minutes there. The time just sort of stopped running. I can't even tell you where I went at that point. I just know it was a Rothko experience unlike one I've had before."

'Looking At The Beyond'

These paintings do not feature the luminous color fields that made Rothko famous. The paintings in the chapel are dark, in purplish or black hues. And there's a reason for that, says Umari.

"They're sort of a window to beyond," she explains. "He said the bright colors sort of stop your vision at the canvas, where dark colors go beyond. And definitely you're looking at the beyond. You're looking at the infinite."

At first glance, the paintings appear to be made up of solid, dark colors. But look closely, and it becomes evident that the paintings are composed of many uneven washes of pigment that create variations in every inch. Stepping back, waves of subtle color difference appear across the broad surfaces — leading to an unmistakable impression of physical depth.

The canvases are huge; the largest is about 15 feet by 11 feet. Susan Barnes, author of The Rothko Chapel: An Act of Faith, was at the chapel the day they were installed.

"What I remember most of all was these large paintings, one at a time, being put in a sling and lowered through the skylight," Barnes says. "The largest of these ... the four single monochrome paintings ... barely cleared."

In fact, the first day, the truck and the crane had to be sent back because it was too windy. Think about a massive, wall-sized painting, Barnes says, "and think about as it as a sail. It was too dangerous."

'A Holy Space'

Back in 1970 when the paintings arrived, Barnes was fresh out of college and working for the de Menils. They hired architect Philip Johnson to design the building and Rothko to fill it. But the painter had such specific ideas about the space that Johnson bowed out.

It was always intended to be more than an art gallery, though. In a 1972 interview, Dominique de Menil said she saw it as a meeting place — a gathering place "of people who are not just going to debate and discuss theological problems, but who are going to meet because they want to find contact with other people. They are searching for this brotherhood of humanity."

Religious leaders from around the world participated in the chapel's dedication in late February 1971. Forty years later, the chapel continues to be a space devoted to personal contemplation, interfaith dialogue and the fight for human rights. Though Mark Rothko didn't live to see the sanctuary he created, Christopher Rothko says his father knew what it should be.

"It took me a while to realize it, but that's really my father's gift, in a sense, to somebody who comes to the chapel. It's a place that will really not just invite, but also demand a kind of journey."

The journey for onetime art-history student Barnes led to a ministry in the Episcopal Church. She says that over the years, the chapel has become a sacred place.

"You walk into this chapel and you know, now, that it has been sanctified by the prayers of the people. There is something you feel in the chapel that tells you it is a holy space." [Copyright 2011 National Public Radio]

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Thank you,

Kenyatta Lovett
Sent from my iPad